The innovation of loneliness

We no longer have actual conversations. We “connect” and “share”. The irony, indeed.

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Deep think of the week: Ask yourself one simple question

A simple question reveals complicated truths. The answers, thoughts and revelations that bubble up to the surface will make you learn things about yourself.

Watch this video and go ahead, ask yourself the simple question. The visit http://www.fiftypeopleonequestion.com and post your response.

I’ve learned that the worst fears are not what other people can do to you. What’s harder is when you are alone and answer the tough questions of every day life: What do you stand for? What do you believe in? How far will you go to stand up for what you believe?

— Filipino journalist Maria A Ressa speaking before FEU graduating class 2012.

Idol! When I grow up, I want to be like her! 😉

More choice quotes from the speech:

“Meaning is not something you stumble across nor what someone gives you. You build it through every choice you make, through the commitments you choose, the people you love, and the values you live by.”

“How do you build meaning into your life? … You build meaning by choosing what you commit to: whether it’s a cause, a religion, an ethical order, the people you love, the nation you are creating.”

Monday list

April always makes me think of summer, no classes, beach and just having all the time in the world. That is, of course, the April of my childhood and that hasn’t been the case with my Aprils since I was, oh, 18 maybe, back in the Jurassic era! But so what, right? I still can dream of my perfect April/summer season in which all I need do is…

… read and make inroads into my book debt. In the pipeline this year: Stephen King’s 11/22/63, Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter and Unholy Night both by Seth Grahame-Smith, in which the three wise men are protagonists in a sword-and-sandals epic — here’s an excerpt.And yes, The Hunger Games trilogy is also in this book debt. Argh!

… try and live lightly. I need a change in mindset and the article “The Elements of Living Lightly” perfectly encapsulates what needs to change in me: Think of nothing that happens as either good or bad. Stop judging, and stop expecting. It may not always work, but can’t hurt to try. At the very least, it presents you with a clean slate.

… eat right. And I need these portion plates to do that. OK, I don’t need these plates, but they’re just damn cute!

… need to run and walk more, so I need these Japanese sneakers with baked on soles in my life. And these Skechers running shoes.

… go somewhere, anywhere — preferably to a beach.

… or failing that, hole up this Holy Week to watch Game of Thrones, season 2! Here’s a refresher course.

The world is thirsty because we are hungry

Didn’t know it was UN World Water Day yesterday. This year’s theme is “Water and Food Security: The world is thirsty because we are hungry.” Some sobering facts about our rising water consumption:

“It takes around 3,000 litres of water, converted from liquid to vapour, to produce enough food to satisfy one person’s daily dietary need. This is a considerable amount, when compared to that required for drinking, which is between two and five litres. To produce food for the 6.5 billion or so people who inhabit the planet today requires the water that would fill a canal ten metres deep, 100 metres wide and 7.1 million kilometres long – that’s enough to circle the globe 180 times.” Yikes!
Here’s another article worth reading from National Geographic: “Demographers project that the world will add another one billion people by 2025.  That means, between now and then, an additional 210,000 people will join the global dinner table every night.  At the same time, many millions will achieve incomes sufficient to add more meat to their diets.  Because it takes water to grow the grain to feed the cows, pigs and chickens, this means the water footprint of that global dinner table could rise considerably faster than population growth.Under some quite conservative assumptions, it could take an additional 1,314 billion cubic meters of water per year – equal to the annual flow of 73 Colorado rivers – to meet the world’s dietary needs in 2025.

That’s a disheartening prospect. Where in the world can we find affordable farm water equivalent to 73 Colorado Rivers without hastening the depletion of rivers, lakes and aquifers?”

Want to know how much water we consume when, say, drink a cup of joe? To make one gallon (3.8 litres) of coffee requires 880 gallons (3,331 litres) of water. One cup of coffee requires 37 gallons (140 litres) of water! Check out this infographic.

[Photo: Lake Baikal in Siberia is the largest freshwater lake in the world. Photo from fotopedia.com]

The world is thirsty because we are hungry